While Maine gets slammed with snow, folks down South got a whopping three inches or less

One of the things we’re very proud of here in Maine is our hardiness when it comes to cold weather and snow and ice. We can drive in it. We can shovel it. We can be outside in it for hours. This is Maine. We’re prepared.

Which is why we hope you’ll permit us a bit of schadenfreude when we see photos of people in the Southern U.S. flailing helplessly about as an inch or less of snow falls on the ground. “Bah!” we say. “You silly people, with your bald tires and lack of proper outerwear, thinking 35 degrees is cold! YOU DON’T KNOW NOTHIN’!”

To be real for a second, yes, we know it can be really dangerous in parts of the world unaccustomed to cold weather, and it’s not their fault they don’t know how to deal with it, and with climate change (which is a real thing) making odd events like this more and more likely, well, we can’t laugh for long. But let’s laugh for just moment right now, shall we?

First off: South Carolina. Look at this cute kid, sledding down a hill, being chased by this cute dog. She’s on a boogie board. Not a sled. ‘Nuff said. Also, love that the caption here calls this a “brutal” winter storm. You got three inches of snow. Look up brutal in the dictionary.

Finley Bork, 7, sleds down a hill, while being chased by a playful dog, on a golf course at the Isle of Palms, South Carolina, Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018. A brutal winter storm dumped snow in Tallahassee, Florida, on Wednesday for the first time in nearly three decades before slogging up the Atlantic coast and smacking Southern cities such as Savannah and Charleston, South Carolina, with a rare blast of snow and ice. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)

Next: North Carolina, where they got 3.8 inches of snow. Golly. They did, however, get 70 mph gusts of winds, which is definitely no joke.

Homes along Banks Channel in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, are covered in snow Thursday Jan. 4, 2017. Areas along North Carolina’s coast are reporting wind gusts of hurricane strength as part of a winter storm that’s moving up the East Coast. (Ken Blevins/The Wilmington News-Journal via AP)

More North Carolina. Isn’t that precious?

A snowman was built along the shore in Wrightsville Beach, N.C. early Thursday morning Jan. 4, 2017. Just over 3 inches of snow covered the area after a winter storm moved through late last night. Areas along North Carolina’s coast are reporting wind gusts of hurricane strength as part of a winter storm that’s moving up the East Coast. (Ken Blevins/The Wilmington News-Journal via AP)

In Georgia, parts of the state received between 1 and 2 inches of snow, and temperatures were in the low 30s, which is shorts weather for January in Maine. A fountain in Atlanta froze. We don’t have fountains for most of the year here in Maine because it’s ALWAYS COLD.


Kenneth Freeman, carries his daughter Alora, 8, as they visit a frozen water fountain downtown in Atlanta, Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018. A brutal winter storm scattered a wintry mix of snow, sleet and freezing rain from normally balmy north Florida up the Southeast seaboard Wednesday, adding to the misery of a bitter cold snap. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal declared a state of emergency through Friday for at least 28 counties because of the frigid weather. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

And then, Maine’s bizarro twin to the south, Florida. Poor Florida. It got down to the mid-30s in parts of the state, and they received between .1 and .25 inches of snow or ice in the north. You poor, poor little dears.

Icicles hang from the “Welcome to Hilliard sign” in Hilliard, Florida, Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018. A brutal winter storm scattered a wintry mix of snow, sleet and freezing rain from normally balmy Florida up the Southeast seaboard Wednesday. (Bob Self/The Florida Times-Union via AP)

A thin layer of ice covers ornamental plants Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018, in Plant City, Florida. Temperatures in central Florida dipped to below freezing. Growers spray water on the plants to help protect them from extreme cold temperatures. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)

Sherri Guidish and Ron Wright, of Fort Lauderdale, walk on Lauderdale-By-The-Sea beach, on Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018. Guidish, who walks the beach every morning, admitted to wearing three layers of clothing but said the cold doesn’t bother her. “I love it. I don’t Iike when it’s raining and cold, but it’s beautiful today.” (Amy Beth Bennett, Sun Sentinel/TNS)

Emily Burnham

About Emily Burnham

Emily Burnham is a Maine native, UMaine graduate, proud Bangorian and a writer and editor for Bangor Metro Magazine, the Weekly and the Bangor Daily News, where she's worked since 2004. She reports on everything from local bands to local food to all the cool things going on in the Greater Bangor area. In her quest for stories, she's seen countless concerts and plays, been lobster fishing, interviewed celebrities, hung out with water buffalo and played in a ukulele orchestra. She's interested in everything that happens in Maine. Albums for review are accepted digitally only; please no CDs.