This scene in Netflix’s adaptation of Stephen King’s ‘Gerald’s Game’ is making people sick

Photo courtesy Netflix

Netflix’s adaptation of Stephen King’s novel “Gerald’s Game” came out on the streaming platform two weeks ago, and it’s received rave reviews, with an 89 percent fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Critics have praised Carla Gugino’s bravura performance as Jessie Burlingame, and the film’s agonizing, slow-burning pace.

But there’s one scene in the horror film that’s really bothering some people — like, really, really bothering them. Lose your lunch sort of bothering them. If you’ve read the book, you know exactly what it is.

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For those that don’t want spoilers, let’s just say that Jessie, who finds herself handcuffed to a bed after her husband suddenly dies from a heart attack, has to find a way out of the cuffs.

For those that don’t mind spoilers — or aren’t going to watch the gruesome scene regardless — here’s filmmaker Mike Flanagan’s take on it, in an interview with Slash Film.

… the principle difference is the sound. I think that’s the only difference… Because we weren’t really using music in the film almost ever, all that sound design is just front and center. That’s kind of what makes it so intense. Even when I would look away while we were shooting it and when we were editing, you can’t get away from the sound. It’s some of the most uncomfortable noise and we just crank it right up. We just wanted to hear every little squish and pop and stretch. It’s gnarly stuff.”

You get the picture. Have you watched “Gerald’s Game” yet? Were you as disturbed by the scene in question as others appear to be? Or will you avoid something that sounds as gross as this does?

Emily Burnham

About Emily Burnham

Emily Burnham is a Maine native, UMaine graduate, proud Bangorian and a writer and editor for Bangor Metro Magazine, the Weekly and the Bangor Daily News, where she's worked since 2004. She reports on everything from local bands to local food to all the cool things going on in the Greater Bangor area. In her quest for stories, she's seen countless concerts and plays, been lobster fishing, interviewed celebrities, hung out with water buffalo and played in a ukulele orchestra. She's interested in everything that happens in Maine. Albums for review are accepted digitally only; please no CDs.