Stephen King’s 1992 novel “Gerald’s Game” headed for Netflix adaptation

geralds game

Though it’s been in the works for several years now, it appears that director Mike Flanagan and the man himself have confirmed that Stephen King’s 1992 novel, “Gerald’s Game,” will be coming to the small screen in the near future.

Netflix did not confirm directly, but director Flanagan — known for his popular Netflix-released 2016 thriller film “Hush,” as well as the 2013 horror film “Oculus” — said in a lengthy interview with Rue Morgue Magazine that after “Hush” was such a success for Netflix, talk about “Gerald’s Game” reopened after two years.

“Coincidentally, Stephen King watched ‘Hush’ at home on Netflix and tweeted about it, which kind of blew my mind. And that got us talking about ‘Gerald’s Game’ again,” said Flanagan, in the interview.

Though no time table for release has been revealed, Flanagan in the interview said that as a diehard fan of the author, “Gerald’s Game” is one of his favorite King novels.

“Stephen King has been my hero since I was a child, and one of the things about being a fan of his is that I’m used to the familiar heartbreak of seeing his film adaptations and feeling like something’s gone off, and that the source material I love so much has not translated properly — with obvious exceptions,” said Flanagan. “It’s very important for me, as a fan, not to end up in that pile. I loved ‘Gerald’s Game’ from the minute I put it down; I had gooseflesh all over my arms and my neck when I finished it, and I remember just exhaling and saying, ‘I want to make this into a movie—and it’s unfilmable!’ and shaking my head, thinking, ‘If I could crack this, this could be one of the greatest King adaptations of them all.'”

“Gerald’s Game” is one of the more disturbing of King’s already disturbing body of work — not to give too much away, but the premise revolves around a woman, handcuffed to a bed in a remote cabin in the woods, with her very recently deceased husband on top of her, slowly going crazy as she knows that no one else knows she’s there. It sounds challenging to adapt into a movie, but as Flanagan said in his interview, it’s a challenge he’s game for.

Emily Burnham

About Emily Burnham

Emily Burnham is a Maine native, UMaine graduate, proud Bangorian and a writer and editor for Bangor Metro Magazine, the Weekly and the Bangor Daily News, where she's worked since 2004. She reports on everything from local bands to local food to all the cool things going on in the Greater Bangor area. In her quest for stories, she's seen countless concerts and plays, been lobster fishing, interviewed celebrities, hung out with water buffalo and played in a ukulele orchestra. She's interested in everything that happens in Maine. Albums for review are accepted digitally only; please no CDs.